Month: September 2018

Using one-meter class telescopes at Las Cumbres Observatory in Chile, astronomers are targeting the whole disk of the nearby Andromeda Galaxy in what is arguably the most ambitious optical SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) campaign ever undertaken. It’s part of a trillion-planet survey led by the University of California in Santa Barbara. The Andromeda Galaxy
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By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic. This information is shared
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By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic. This information is shared
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The human brain is a remarkable thing. It can do things our primate relatives are thousands – maybe even millions – of years of evolution away from, and our most complex machines are not even close to competing with our powers of higher consciousness and ingenuity. And yet, those 100 billion or so neurons are also incredibly fragile. If
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Yes, indeed, but not the way you might think. It turns out we need a little bit of radiation to function in tip-top shape. And it’s all about our genes. The latest studies from New Mexico State University demonstrate that the absence of radiation is not good for organisms. Biological Effects of Radiation are well
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NEWS ANALYSIS More Evidence That Nutrition Studies Don’t Always Add Up A Cornell food scientist’s downfall could reveal a bigger problem in nutrition research. Image Dr. Brian Wansink at the 2013 Discovery Vitality Summit in Johannesburg.CreditCreditLefty Shivambu/Gallo Images By Anahad O’Connor Sept. 29, 2018 Not too long ago, Brian Wansink was one of the most
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A magnitude 7.5 earthquake has struck off the coast of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, triggering a 1.8-metre (6-foot) tsunami. The wave tore through several of the island’s coastal cities and towns, including the capital Palu, on Friday. The devastating quake has been followed by multiple strong aftershocks, and comes shortly after a magnitude 6.1
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Problem constraints As stated in the previous paragraph, an optimal primer-set-pair should simultaneously maximize efficiency and coverage and minimize matching-bias. In the following, we describe how we quantitatively encoded these constraints. Efficiency The perfect primer-set-pairs should satisfy several constraints, aimed at improving PCR efficiency and specificity [7]. However, concurrently satisfying all constraints is often impractical
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Experimental datasets setup The performances of the algorithms were evaluated on the BCI Competition IV [27] “Dataset 2a” and “Dataset 2b”1. The two datasets are compared in Table 3. Figure 6 illustrates how the single-trial EEG data were extracted on “Dataset 2a” and “Dataset 2b”. The two datasets share the same procedure. In the motor imagery classification
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Global health Ebola Likely to Spread From Congo to Uganda, W.H.O. Says Local fighting and fleeing patients led the organization to increase its alert level. The disease has appeared in a Congolese fishing village near Uganda. Image Medical staff in Bundibugyo, Uganda, near Congo’s border, investigate a suspected Ebola case. CreditCreditSumy Sadurni/Agence France-Presse — Getty
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Abstract Spontaneous activity is a fundamental characteristic of the developing nervous system. Intriguingly, it often takes the form of multiple structured assemblies of neurons. Such assemblies can form even in the absence of afferent input, for instance in the zebrafish optic tectum after bilateral enucleation early in life. While the development of neural assemblies based
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Reconstruction of a tomb in St. Paul’s Catacombs, Rabat, Malta.Kristina Killgrove Deep underground in the middle of the tiny island country of Malta lies a series of ancient catacombs, communal burial grounds that date back millennia. Malta has always been a way-station on journeys between Africa and southern Europe, with extraordinary diversity in its past
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Mars, along with its thin atmosphere, as photographed from the Viking orbiter in the 1970s. The bright red atmosphere is due to the presence of Martian dust in the atmosphere, and the composition of Mars rocks was first discovered by the Viking landers.NASA/Viking 1 As the planets orbit the Sun, well-separated from one another, we
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In the past few decades, researchers have opened up the extraordinary world of microbes living on and within the human body, linking their influence to everything from rheumatoid arthritis to healthy brain function. Yet we know comparatively little about the rich broth of microbes and chemicals in the air around us, even though we inhale
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Posted by: RNA-Seq Blog in Publications 4 hours ago 75 Views Post-transcriptional RNA processing is a core mechanism of gene expression control in cell stress response. The poly(A) tail influences mRNA translation and stability, but it is unclear whether there are global roles of poly(A)-tail lengths in cell stress. To address this, Cornell University researchers
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With an award from the National Institutes of Health, a team led by Dmitry Korkin will develop next-generation machine learning algorithms that could advance our understanding of the molecular biology of disease and the field of personalized medicine A team of computer scientists at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has received a two-year, $347,000 award from
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A new study, published in the journal The Plant Cell, could help guide new bioengineering approaches to encourage plants to produce higher levels of oil for biofuels and other oil-based products. Previous research led by John Shanklin at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory had shown that an enzyme known to be involved in sensing
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Towards quantitative and multiplexed in vivo functional cancer genomics Towards quantitative and multiplexed in vivo functional cancer genomics, Published online: 28 September 2018; doi:10.1038/s41576-018-0053-7 CRISPR–Cas genome editing and next-generation sequencing are driving advances in cancer modelling and functional cancer genomics. Their application to autochthonous mouse models of human cancer to generate and analyse multiplexed and/or
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Therapeutic strategies for Parkinson disease: beyond dopaminergic drugs Therapeutic strategies for Parkinson disease: beyond dopaminergic drugs, Published online: 28 September 2018; doi:10.1038/nrd.2018.136 Existing dopaminergic-based therapies for Parkinson disease (PD) are limited by side effects and lack of long-term efficacy. Here, Charvin et al. discuss the challenges facing the development of novel treatments for PD, assess
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Are tolerance and training required to end TB? Are tolerance and training required to end TB?, Published online: 28 September 2018; doi:10.1038/s41577-018-0070-y Host defence strategies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), include host resistance and disease tolerance. To date, most studies have focused on resistance mechanisms, but developing new strategies to
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Imaging the evolution and pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease Imaging the evolution and pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease, Published online: 28 September 2018; doi:10.1038/s41583-018-0067-3 Various techniques can be used to image aspects of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease in humans, notably protein deposition and neurodegeneration. In this Review, William Jagust discusses how human neuroimaging studies have shaped
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Targeting G protein-coupled receptor signalling by blocking G proteins Targeting G protein-coupled receptor signalling by blocking G proteins, Published online: 28 September 2018; doi:10.1038/nrd.2018.135 Identifying ligands of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that elicit biased downstream signalling is an established strategy for separating the desired and unwanted effects of these receptors. Campbell and Smrcka describe how
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Abstract Interactions among microbial community members can lead to emergent properties, such as enhanced productivity, stability, and robustness. Iron-oxide mats in acidic (pH 2–4), high-temperature (> 65 °C) springs of Yellowstone National Park contain relatively simple microbial communities and are well-characterized geochemically. Consequently, these communities are excellent model systems for studying the metabolic activity of
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