Month: November 2018

Citation: Shoko R, Manasa J, Maphosa M, Mbanga J, Mudziwapasi R, Nembaware V, et al. (2018) Strategies and opportunities for promoting bioinformatics in Zimbabwe. PLoS Comput Biol 14(11): e1006480. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006480 Editor: Christos A. Ouzounis, CPERI, GREECE Published: November 29, 2018 Copyright: © 2018 Shoko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the
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Abstract Trial-and-error learning is a universal strategy for establishing which actions are beneficial or harmful in new environments. However, learning stimulus-response associations solely via trial-and-error is often suboptimal, as in many settings dependencies among stimuli and responses can be exploited to increase learning efficiency. Previous studies have shown that in settings featuring such dependencies, humans
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Abstract To map the neural substrate of mental function, cognitive neuroimaging relies on controlled psychological manipulations that engage brain systems associated with specific cognitive processes. In order to build comprehensive atlases of cognitive function in the brain, it must assemble maps for many different cognitive processes, which often evoke overlapping patterns of activation. Such data
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Tourists take pictures of a NASA sign at the Kennedy Space Center visitors complex in Cape Canaveral, Florida April 14, 2010. REUTERS/Carlos Barria ORLANDO, Fla. (Reuters) – NASA on Thursday named nine U.S. companies, including Lockheed Martin Corp, that will compete for funding under the space agency’s renewed long-term moon program, a private-public undertaking to
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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A prehistoric 15-foot-long (4.5 meters) whale that sucked prey into its mouth represents a key missing puzzle piece concerning the evolution of today’s huge filter-feeding whales, scientists said on Thursday. An illustration showing an artistic reconstruction of a mother and calf of Maiabalaena nesbittae nursing offshore of Oregon during the Oligocene, close
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Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin Sea ice in the Sannikov Strait thinning in the summer months of 2016.Lauren Dauphin/USGS/NASA Sometimes, the best way to be reminded of how utterly beautiful the planet is, you need to see it from above. Fortunately, NASA Earth Observatory’s absolutely stunning collection of satellite images constantly provides
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SHANGHAI (Reuters) – The Chinese government on Thursday ordered a temporary halt to research activities for people involve in the editing human genes, after a Chinese scientist said he had edited the genes of twin babies. Scientist He Jiankui attends the International Summit on Human Genome Editing at the University of Hong Kong in Hong
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For almost a decade, cleaning rituals ruled Kathrine’s life. The middle-aged resident of Bergen, a coastal town in the southern tip of Norway, was consumed by a fear of germs and contamination that led to endless cycles of tidying, vacuuming and washing. “I realized that I was facing a catastrophe,” Kathrine Mydland-aas, now 41, recalls.
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For almost a decade, cleaning rituals ruled Kathrine’s life. The middle-aged resident of Bergen, a coastal town in the southern tip of Norway, was consumed by a fear of germs and contamination that led to endless cycles of tidying, vacuuming and washing. “I realized that I was facing a catastrophe,” Kathrine Mydland-aas, now 41, recalls.
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Before the tearing, the choking and the pouring mucus, tear gas burns. It causes searing pain in the eyes, skin, lungs and mouth—or anywhere it touches. “It can be overwhelming and incapacitating. You can be forced to shut your eyes and cannot open them,” says Sven-Eric Jordt, an anesthesiologist at Duke University. And then comes
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SAN DIEGO—In the textbook explanation for how information is encoded in the brain, neurons fire a rapid burst of electrical signals in response to inputs from the senses or other stimulation. The brain responds to a light turning on in a dark room with the short bursts of nerve impulses, called spikes. Each close grouping
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Age-associated deterioration of cellular physiology leads to pathological conditions. The ability to detect premature aging could provide a window for preventive therapies against age-related diseases. However, the techniques for determining cellular age are limited, as they rely on a limited set of histological markers and lack predictive power. Here, a team led by researchers at
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To treat and prevent pregnancy-related disorders, researchers must understand not only what can go wrong, but when. Complications, such as preeclampsia and pre-term birth, often occur in the second or third trimester, and most research to date has focused on those later stages of pregnancy. But the biological events that lead to these problems could
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Atomic clocks, based on the minute oscillations of atoms, are the most precise timekeeping devices humans have created. Every year, scientists make adjustments that improve the precision of these devices. Now, they’ve achieved new performance records, making two atomic clocks so precise they could detect gravitational waves, those faint ripples in the fabric of space-time.
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Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin Recently, I came across a video featuring Jimmy Fallon interacting with the world’s first robot citizen, Sophia, and a new edition to the robot world, her little sister, Little Sophia. If you have not come across Sophia and Hanson Robotics then check out Zara‘s article to
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He Jiankui, the Chinese researcher who claimed this week to have helped produce the world’s first genetically altered babies, said Wednesday there was another “potential pregnancy” involved in his study as he defended a procedure that has shaken the scientific world. Appearing in public for the first time since revealing he had successfully altered the
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Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin Researchers at Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have secured funding for two projects that will help make cancer radiation therapies faster and less destructive to healthy tissue. The most amazing bit about this work is that the scientists aim to reduce cancer radiation therapy
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Amazon.com Inc’s autonomous toy car, The AWS DeepRacer, one-eighteenth the size of a real race car, aimed at helping web developers try some some of their own self-driving technology, is shown in this handout photo provided November 28, 2018. REUTERS/Amazon.com/Handout via REUTERS LAS VEGAS (Reuters) – Self-driving cars, meet Amazon’s self-driving toys. Amazon.com Inc’s cloud
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Acknowledgements Rob Clucas developed the first dockerised version of the WitsGWAS pipeline on which the H3Agwas pipeline was developed. We acknowledge with thanks advice and help from: Ananyo Choudhury, Dhriti Sengupta, Alex Rodriguez, Segun Jung, Abayomi Mosaku, Anmol Kiran and Harry Noyes. Development and testing were performed using facilities provided by the University of Cape
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Recent advances in third-generation single-molecule sequencing have enabled de novo genome assemblies that have extremely high levels of contiguity and completeness [1–3]. Furthermore, recent advances in ‘diploid aware’ genome assemblers have considerably improved the quality of highly heterozygous diploid genome assemblies [4, 5]. Diploid-aware assemblers such as FALCON and Canu are available that will produce
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The value of genetic testing for family health history of adopted persons The value of genetic testing for family health history of adopted persons, Published online: 29 November 2018; doi:10.1038/s41576-018-0080-4 The lack of family health history experienced by most adopted persons can represent a marked disadvantage for these individuals. Genetic testing has the potential to
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Abstract Sequencing of the T cell receptor repertoire is a powerful tool for deeper study of immune response, but the unique structure of this type of data makes its meaningful quantification challenging. We introduce a new method, the Gamma-GPD spliced threshold model, to address this difficulty. This biologically interpretable model captures the distribution of the
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LONDON, Nov 28 (Reuters) – – Scientists in Britain have succeeded in creating mini human placenta organoids which they say will transform scientific understanding of reproductive disorders such as pre-eclampsia and miscarriage. The organoids – miniature functional cellular models of the human placenta’s earliest stages – will also allow researchers to explore what makes a
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Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin The Oyster Thief by Sonia FaruqiPriya Shukla The Oyster Thief is author Sonia Faruqi‘s debut novel about an underwater civilization of merpeople whose Central Atlantic Ocean settlement is threatened by enterprising humans committed to mining the ocean for resources at any expense – including the welfare of ocean life. Published
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The world’s expectations for a hero have perhaps never been lower. Which brings us to the steer. It’s like a normal steer, but bigger. It’s a very big steer. The very big steer is, according to the nearly unanimous acclaim on social media, a hero. At 6 feet 4 inches tall and more than 1.4
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