Month: January 2019

When faced with a piece of junk, do you try to fix it or just move on? Well, it depends on the junk, doesn’t it?CC0 Creative Commons Junk science is everywhere, and it takes many pernicious forms. There are the outright scams, of course, advertised by charlatans aiming to make a quick and easy buck. There
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Strains, media and growth conditions All Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in this study were derived from the wildtype haploid BY4741 (MATa his3∆1 leu2∆0 met15∆0 ura3∆0) strain as previously described5,7. All experiments were conducted in acidic YPD media as originally described5. Normally cells were grown to mid-logarithmic phase (T1; OD660 0.5–0.6) at 30 °C. For heat shock
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NPR’s Audie Cornish talks with Associated Press reporter Marilynn Marchione about the Chinese government’s investigation into He Jiankui, who claims he created the world’s first gene-edited babies. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: An update now on the Chinese scientist who shocked the world last fall when he claimed that he’d created the world’s first genetically modified babies.
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As head of Johnson & Johnson Innovation, JLABS New York, Boston and Philadelphia, Kate Merton identifies, recruits and develops some of the most innovative startups in the healthcare industry. I sat down with her to talk about the integration of the values of a hundred-thirty-year-old parent company, her leadership philosophy and entrepreneurship initiative, personal career
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Enlarge this image A scanning electron micrograph shows microglial cells (yellow) ingesting branched oligodendrocyte cells (purple), a process thought to occur in multiple sclerosis. Oligodendrocytes form insulating myelin sheaths around nerve axons in the central nervous system. Dr. John Zajicek/Science Source hide caption toggle caption Dr. John Zajicek/Science Source As the story goes, nearly 80
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He Jiankui at the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong KongREX/Shutterstock By Michael Le Page A preliminary investigation into the creation of gene-edited babies in China has concluded that Chinese researcher He Jiankui “illegally conducted the research in the pursuit of personal fame and gain”, reports the Xinhua state news agency. An investigating team set up
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Could anyone recommend a good algorithms MOOC or book? Even better if it is focused on bioinformatics/computational biology algorithms. I was going to start EdX’s UCSD Algorithm Designs and Techniques, but apparently the course is going to be archived by the end of this month so I was afraid it might not be up-to-date. Thanks.
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HONG KONG — A Chinese scientist who claimed to have created the world’s first genetically edited babies “seriously violated” state regulations, according to the results of an initial government investigation reported on Monday by Chinese state media. The investigators’ findings indicate that the scientist, He Jiankui, and his collaborators are likely to face criminal charges.
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Scientists may have just taken a step towards experimentally proving the existence of Hawking radiation. Using an optical fibre analogue of an event horizon – a lab-created model of black hole physics – researchers from Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel report that they have created stimulated Hawking radiation. Under general relativity, a black
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Posted by: RNA-Seq Blog in Presentations 2 hours ago 59 Views Next-generation sequencing has evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool helping thousands get answers to the most challenging disease diagnoses. Even with today’s newest equipment, many diagnostic reports may include one or more VUS that are hard to interpret as being potentially pathogenic or uninvolved.
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BEIJING (Reuters) – A Chinese scientist who said he made the world’s first “gene-edited” babies intentionally evaded oversight and broke national guidelines in a quest for fame and fortune, according to a government investigation quoted in state media on Monday. FILE PHOTO: Scientist He Jiankui speaks at his company Direct Genomics in Shenzhen, Guangdong province,
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Posted by: Klemen Hrovat in Publications, User Submitted Posts 2 hours ago 39 Views Huntington’s disease (HD) is characterized by hypomyelination and neuronal loss. To assess the basis for myelin loss in HD, we generated bipotential glial progenitor cells (GPCs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) derived from mutant Huntingtin (mHTT) embryos or normal controls
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NEW YORK/LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Many lunar eclipse festivities were canceled due to a flash freeze across the central and northeastern U.S. states on Sunday, with icy roadways rather than cloudy skies blamed by astronomers for spoiling the party. The full moon is seen ahead of a total lunar eclipse, known as the “super blood
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1. Fuster, J. M. & Alexander, G. E. Neuron activity related to short-term memory. Science 173, 652–654 (1971). 2. Wang, X. J. Synaptic reverberation underlying mnemonic persistent activity. Trends Neurosci. 24, 455–463 (2001). 3. Goldman, M. S. Memory without feedback in a neural network. Neuron 61, 621–634 (2009). 4. Druckmann, S. & Chklovskii, D. B.
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Yeast strains and insect cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain LJ1450 (MATa ade1-14 trp1-289 his3D-200 ura3-52 leu2-3,112 SUP35::loxP p[SUP35-URA3][PSI+]) was used for shuffling experiments and phenotypic assays. LJ14-derived strains made in this study for yeast phenotypic experiments are listed in Supplementary Table 2. Standard rich (YPD) and Synthetic Dropout (SD) Media were used to culture yeast cells at
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One of the people affected by the Clark County, Washington, measles outbreak attended a Portland Trailblazers game at the Moda Center on January 11. Pictured here is the arena on Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018. (AP Photo/Craig Mitchelldyer) Look at what made the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) just-released list of “10 threats to global health in 2019.” Right
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Lake Mercer, a subglacial lake deep below the Antarctic Ice, sat untouched by humans for millennia – until now. Scientists accidentally discovered the lake in 2007, when they were examining satellite imagery of Antarctica’s ice sheet. Then on December 26, 2018, they finally reached it. To explore the 50-foot-deep subglacial lake, researchers from a project called SALSA
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Technology companies have been pummelled by revelations about how poorly they protect their customers’ personal information, including an in-depth New York Times report detailing the ability of smartphone apps to track users’ locations. Some companies, most notably Apple, have begun promoting the fact that they sell products and services that safeguard consumer privacy. Smartphone users
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It’s better to focus on one single argument than many at once.Free for commercial use (via Pixabay) Whether it’s in a formal public debate or a conversation over family dinner, arguments are bound to happen. After all, we’re just human, and all seven billion of us have a variety of opinions about a variety of
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If the skies are clear, the entire eclipse will be visible in North and South America, as well as Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Portugal and the French and Spanish coasts. The rest of Europe, as well as Africa, will have partial viewing before the moon sets. Some places will be livestreaming it,
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The world is going to run out of food. Don’t worry, the best minds are on it. They are using better seeds, lighting and irrigation systems to reimagine farming. They are also using robots. And this has attracted the attention of, not to mention funding from, several high-profile humans. Melons in the greenhouse farm. Young
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Image CreditCraig Frazier It was a well-intended policy. Almost all parties agree on that much. A decade ago, when Medicare beneficiaries were discharged from hospitals, one in five returned within a month. Older people faced the risks of hospitalization all over again: infections, deconditioning, delirium, subsequent nursing home stays. And preventable readmissions were costing Medicare
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When Akihiko Kondo, a 35-year-old school administrator in Tokyo, strolled down the aisle in a white tuxedo in November, his mother was not among the 40 well-wishers in attendance. For her, he said, “it was not something to celebrate.” You might see why. The bride, a songstress with aquamarine twin tails named Hatsune Miku, is
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As Dr. Martin Luther King’s National Day of Service approaches, I had an interesting thought as a scientist, writer, and human being. Climate change is one of the most significant challenges facing humanity, and its impacts stretch far beyond science. Climate change is often discussed from the lens of agriculture, energy, public health, national security,
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Enlarge this image The key to making the quintessential biscuit of the American South, like these from Callie’s Charleston Biscuits Bakery in Charleston, S.C., is more about technique than a specific flour, some bakers say. Brett Flashnick/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Brett Flashnick/The Washington Post/Getty Images Cheryl Day makes hundreds of biscuits
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