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More than 200,000 stars appear in this test image from TESS.Credit: NASA / MIT / TESS TESS—the new planet-hunting probe—is up, running, and almost ready to rumble. The robotic spacecraft, launched 12 weeks ago, is now locked into “final science orbit,” says NASA’s Padi Boyd. So far, all is good. Everything on TESS checks out,
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Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin A picture taken on July 13, 2018 shows an iceberg behind houses and buildings after it grounded outside the village of Innarsuit, an island settlement in the Avannaata municipality in northwestern Greenland. (KARL PETERSEN/AFP/Getty Images) From the right angle, the tiny village of Innaarsuit looks a
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Bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level Bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level, Published online: 15 July 2018; doi:10.1038/s41579-018-0057-5 In this Review, Brun and colleagues summarize our understanding of the mechanisms governing bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level, including the physical forces experienced by a cell before reaching the surface, the first contact with a surface
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Structural insights into the signalling mechanisms of two-component systems Structural insights into the signalling mechanisms of two-component systems, Published online: 15 July 2018; doi:10.1038/s41579-018-0055-7 Canonical two-component systems catalyse autophosphorylation of the histidine kinase, transfer of the phosphoryl group to the regulator and dephosphorylation of the phosphoregulator. In this Progress article, Jacob-Dubuisson and colleagues highlight recent
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Medieval Studies has a choice to make. Just this week controversy erupted over the largest annual academic conference devoted to the study of the Middle Ages in all of its forms – the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS), hosted by Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Many academic conferences in the Humanities and Social Sciences work
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Eight critically endangered black rhinoceroses died after being moved from parks near Kenya’s capital to a sanctuary in a national park in the country’s southeast, the government said Friday. Preliminary investigations suggest the rhinos suffered from salt poisoning as they adapted to water with higher saline levels than they were accustomed to, according to tourism
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This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a massive galaxy cluster, PLCK_G308.3-20.2, glowing brightly in the darkness. This is what huge swaths of the distant Universe looks like. But how far does the Universe as-we-know-it, including the unobservable part, go on for?ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS; Acknowledgement: D. Coe et al. 13.8 billion years ago, the
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From savoring a piece of cake to hugging a friend, many of life’s pleasures trigger a similar reaction in the brain—a surge of chemicals that tell the body “that was good, do it again.” Research published Friday in Nature Communications suggests this feel-good circuit may do much more. Using lab tools to activate that reward
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CARNARVON, South Africa (Reuters) – A scientific mega-project to unlock cosmic conundrums from dark energy to detecting extraterrestrial life was given a boost on Friday, when the 64-dish MeerKAT radio telescope was inaugurated in the remote South African town of Carnarvon. FILE PHOTO: Star trails form over radio telescope dishes of the KAT-7 Array in
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Phil and Anthony Butler aren’t just father and son. The physics professor and bioengineering professor (respectively) are also business partners. And this week, their company, MARS Bioimaging, unveiled a first-of-its-kind X-ray scanner 10 years in the making. First, a quick recap of how X-ray imaging works. When X-rays travel through your body, they’re absorbed by
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Autophagy as a promoter of longevity: insights from model organisms Autophagy as a promoter of longevity: insights from model organisms, Published online: 13 July 2018; doi:10.1038/s41580-018-0033-y Recent studies in model organisms uncovered prominent links between autophagy and ageing, suggesting that by removing superfluous or damaged cellular content through lysosomal degradation, autophagy supports tissue and organismal
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Extracellular ATP and P2 purinergic signalling in the tumour microenvironment Extracellular ATP and P2 purinergic signalling in the tumour microenvironment, Published online: 13 July 2018; doi:10.1038/s41568-018-0037-0 In this Review, Di Virgilio et al. describe how extracellular ATP and P2 purinergic signalling can shape the tumour microenvironment to both promote and restrain tumour progression and outline
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Quorum sensing in the immune system Quorum sensing in the immune system, Published online: 13 July 2018; doi:10.1038/s41577-018-0040-4 Quorum sensing is the regulation of gene expression programmes in response to changes in population density. It is probably best recognized as a mechanism through which bacterial communities can synchronize behaviours, such as biofilm formation and bioluminescence.
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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A breakthrough in the study of ghostly particles called high-energy neutrinos that traverse space, zipping unimpeded through people, planets and whole galaxies, is giving scientists an audacious new way to expand our understanding of the cosmos. The IceCube Laboratory is pictured at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, in Antarctica, in 2017 and
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Parrot brains are very similar to primate brains: parrots have a large region that acts as an information superhighway between the two main areas of the brain The Congo African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) is thought to be one of the most intelligent of parrots species.(Credit: Keith Allison / USFWS / Public Domain.)Keith Allison via
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Finally, scientists have found the source for a high-energy cosmic neutrino coming from outside our galaxy. The so-called mysterious “ghost particle”, detected on 22 September 2017, travelled 4 billion light-years to reach us, originating from an extremely energetic object called a blazar. It’s an amazing discovery, one that not only confirms blazars as a source
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Have you ever looked at your partner lovingly and felt your heart flutter, palms sweat, or mood instantly get better? That’s because falling in love actually changes what happens in your body – for the better. When in love, neurochemicals like dopamine and oxytocin flood our brains in areas associated with pleasure and rewards, producing
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Of all the animals, humans have evolved pretty spectacular hands. Our particular manual configuration is unique in the animal kingdom, which means we were probably doing something differently from our primate cousins. Now anthropologists think they have figured out a previously overlooked activity: cracking open bones to get to the rich, fatty, calorie-dense marrow inside.
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Music-driven cupcake icer built by MyMachine studentsTom Vander Ark The premise is simple: ask kids what their dream machine would do and then help them build it.   It started with a little boy named Oskar who wanted a machine to dig for Roman treasure. He made a drawing and wrote a user manual. His
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Shutterstock For those of us who love tennis, we know it is Wimbledon season now, where sportsmanship, mental and physical perseverance come together into one of the most exhilarating tennis tournaments in the world. A couple of years ago, I remember watching a match between a young but talented tennis player versus an established name in
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Multidrug efflux pumps: structure, function and regulation Multidrug efflux pumps: structure, function and regulation, Published online: 12 July 2018; doi:10.1038/s41579-018-0048-6 One factor contributing to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance is the capacity of bacteria to rapidly export drugs through the intrinsic activity of efflux pumps. This Review describes recent insights into the structure, function and
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Every step of the way: integrins in cancer progression and metastasis Every step of the way: integrins in cancer progression and metastasis, Published online: 12 July 2018; doi:10.1038/s41568-018-0038-z In this Review, Hamidi and Ivaska discuss the contribution of integrins to the different steps of cancer progression, highlighting some of the recently identified unconventional roles of
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1. Golgi, C. Sulla Fina Anatomia Degliorgani Centrali del Sistema Nervosa. Revista Sperimentale di Freniatria Reprinted in Golgi, C. Opera Omnia (1903) (Milano, 1885). 2. Cajal, S. R. Estructura del cerebelo. Gac. Med. Catalana 11, 449–457 (1888). 3. Jones, E. G. Colgi, Cajal and the neuron doctrine. J. Hist. Neurosci. 8, 170–178 (1999). This article
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