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Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have developed something akin to a “Google Maps” approach for more accurately computing and visualizing the structural and functional blood vessel changes needed for tumor growth. By pairing high-quality 3D imaging data of tumor specimens from animal models with sophisticated mathematical formulas, the researchers say they now have a
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Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history — and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely, warns a landmark new report from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), the summary of which was approved at the 7th session
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A distinct strain of canine distemper virus, which is a widespread virus of importance to wildlife and domesticated dogs, has been identified in wild animals in New Hampshire and Vermont, according to pathologists with the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Lab at the University of New Hampshire. No virus in this distinct subgroup of canine distemper
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By Deborah Borfitz May 6, 2019 | The business of research has traditionally focused on producing academic papers, limiting the growth of scientific knowledge to “massive incrementalism” around a succession of magic-bullet solutions—microassays, human genome project, robotics and artificial intelligence and, most recently, open science. Instead of research being translated by the market and compatible
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The brain’s capacity for simultaneously learning and memorizing large amounts of information while requiring little energy has inspired an entire field to pursue brain-like — or neuromorphic — computers. Researchers at Stanford University and Sandia National Laboratories previously developed one portion of such a computer: a device that acts as an artificial synapse, mimicking the
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First they mapped the genome of wheat; now they have reconstructed its breeding history. Joining forces with other European researchers, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have examined the genetic diversity of wheat varieties in the WHEALBI study. By doing so, they discovered which cereals our ancestors cultivated, where today’s wheat comes from, and what
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Most people’s experience with seagrass, if any, amounts to little more than a tickle on their ankles while wading in shallow coastal waters. But it turns out these ubiquitous plants, varieties of which exist around the world, could play a key role in protecting vulnerable shores as they face onslaughts from rising sea levels. New
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NGC 2903 is located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo (the Lion), and was studied as part of a Hubble survey of the central regions of roughly 145 nearby disk galaxies. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, L. Ho et al. NGC 2903 is located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation
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Imagine being able to shape a pulse of light in any conceivable manner — compressing it, stretching it, splitting it in two, changing its intensity or altering the direction of its electric field. Controlling the properties of ultrafast light pulses is essential for sending information through high-speed optical circuits and in probing atoms and molecules
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Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D printing replacement organs with a breakthrough technique for bioprinting tissues. The new innovation allows scientists to create exquisitely entangled vascular networks that mimic the body’s natural passageways for blood, air, lymph and other vital fluids. The research is featured on the cover of this
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The combination of a big population, good genes and luck helps explain how a species of fish in Texas’ Houston Ship Channel was able to adapt to what normally would be lethal levels of toxins for most other species, according to a study to be published May 3 in the journal Science. The exceptional survivor
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MIT neuroscientists have performed the most rigorous testing yet of computational models that mimic the brain’s visual cortex. Using their current best model of the brain’s visual neural network, the researchers designed a new way to precisely control individual neurons and populations of neurons in the middle of that network. In an animal study, the
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May 2nd marks the 500th anniversary of the death of a true Renaissance man: Leonardo da Vinci. The Italian polymath remains one of the most essential cultural figures of our time. Here’s what historian Walter Isaacson told Forbes about da Vinci in 2017: Leonardo da Vinci is history’s ultimate example of combining art and science.
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Scientists at Seattle Children’s Research Institute are paving the way to use gene-edited B cells — a type of white blood cell in the immune system — to treat a wide range of potential diseases that affect children, including hemophilia and other protein deficiency disorders, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases. If successful, their research would
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Blocking the processes that drive cancer cell growth is at the heart of many new anti-cancer therapies. Unfortunately, after initial success, cancer cells are generally able to develop workarounds to reactivate the pathways that promote growth. Work by researchers at the Babraham Institute in partnership with the global biopharmaceutical company AstraZeneca shows that this workaround
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A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that some birds prioritize social information over visual evidence when making breeding choices. The quality of an environment can be difficult for a bird to assess and, therefore, continuously gathering information is a good way to stay up-to-date with breeding conditions. In this field study, researchers
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By Deborah Borfitz May 2, 2019 | Achieving the aims of value-based healthcare presumes the free flow of all kinds of data—including physician free text notes, radiology images and medical journal articles—whenever and wherever they’re needed so providers can deliver personalized, evidence-backed care and patients know their options and can make informed choices. In this
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The excrements of hippos play an important role in the ecosystem of African lakes and rivers. Because there are fewer and fewer hippos, this ecosystem is in danger. In the long term, this could lead to food shortages at Lake Victoria, for example. These are some of the results of a new study by an
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Two proteins central to the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease act as prions — misshapen proteins that spread through tissue like an infection by forcing normal proteins to adopt the same misfolded shape — according to new UC San Francisco research. Using novel laboratory tests, the researchers were able to detect and measure specific, self-propagating prion
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Two papers by Michigan State University (MSU) scientists begin challenging a more simplistic, input/output view of natural resources in favor of a way that better reflected how the world really works. That these natural resources don’t just flow or gush down pipelines. That sometimes energy whisks across the world stored in the materials it produces.
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Two cosmochemists at Arizona State University have made the first-ever measurements of water contained in samples from the surface of an asteroid. The samples came from asteroid Itokawa and were collected by the Japanese space probe Hayabusa. The team’s findings suggest that impacts early in Earth’s history by similar asteroids could have delivered as much
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Cotton breeders face a “Catch-22.” Yield from cotton crops is inversely related to fiber quality. In general, as yield improves, fiber quality decreases, and vice-versa. “This is one of the most significant challenges for cotton breeders,” says Peng Chee, a researcher at the University of Georgia. To overcome the yield vs quality challenge, Chee and
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May 1, 2019 | April featured exciting new, products, and partnerships from around the bio-IT community from innovating companies, organizations, and universities, including Thermo Fisher Scientific, LifeArc, Pure Storage, and more. Researchers and scientists analyzing crystallized protein samples in life sciences and materials research can now benefit from the first commercially released integrated solution for performing
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Not everything about glass is clear. How its atoms are arranged and behave, in particular, is startlingly opaque. The problem is that glass is an amorphous solid, a class of materials that lies in the mysterious realm between solid and liquid. Glassy materials also include polymers, or commonly used plastics. While it might appear to
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If southern flounder live in warmer water during a critical window of early development, a higher percentage become male — more than 90 percent in some cases — research from North Carolina State University found. Having a high proportion of adult males over the long term could threaten both wild populations and the valuable commercial
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A new three-dimensional model of the skeletal muscles responsible for bird flight provides the most comprehensive and detailed picture of anatomy to date. In a new study, scientists in pathology and anatomical sciences in the University of Missouri’s School of Medicine have revealed a three-dimensional view of the skeletal muscles responsible for flight in a
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