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The seeds of Alzheimer’s disease may have been transmitted along with human growth hormone into eight British patients treated decades ago, according to a study published Thursday in Nature. If supported by further research, the findings imply Alzheimer’s could potentially be transmitted via close contact with the brain tissue of someone who has the disease.
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Basic lab equipment can produce minuscule 3D-printed objectsEd Boyden and colleagues By Douglas Heaven Making miniscule objects is hard – far easier to make bigger things and then shrink them. That’s the idea behind a 3D printing technique called implosion fabrication. The method can be used to produce a variety of shapes, from tiny hollow spheres
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On April 30, the Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater on Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano, suddenly collapsed. It was the starting point for the volcano’s monthslong eruption, which went on to produce 320,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools’ worth of lava that transformed the landscape and ultimately destroyed 700 homes. Now the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and other scientists
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People who experience the pain and disfigurement of eczema (aka atopic dermatitis, AD) already have to contend with cracked skin, rashes, weeping sores, and endless itching. But that’s not all. New research examining the “profound psychosocial burden” shouldered by people with AD shows they’re not just at greater risk of depression; having the skin condition
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Should the government pay for medical research that uses tissue from aborted fetuses? This debate, ever smoldering, has erupted again, pitting anti-abortion forces in the Trump administration against scientists who say the tissue is essential for studies that benefit millions of patients. In a letter last week that read like a shot across the bow,
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It’s one thing to eat chicken every day. It’s something else to have that on your permanent record, as in the geological record, the remnants of our time that archaeologists or aliens of the future will sift through to determine who we were and how we shaped our world. But a group of scientists argue
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Annie Jump Cannon shared the experience of being deaf with her colleague Henrietta Leavitt.Smithsonian Institution https://www.flickr.com/photos/25053835@N03/3322793868/ December 11 is the birthday of astronomer Annie Jump Cannon, who developed the system astronomers use to classify stars. But the most famous female astronomer in history almost abandoned her scientific career before it started. Astronomers classify stars based
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There is a gradual change afoot at fuel forecourts in several markets, whether developed or developing, being led by none other than the refining and marketing units of energy behemoths, including the top 20 international oil and gas companies ranked by market capitalization – that’s the increasing visibility of electric vehicle (EV) charging points. In Europe, much
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Want climate news in your inbox? Sign up here for Climate Fwd:, our email newsletter. Persistent warming in the Arctic is pushing the region into “uncharted territory” and increasingly affecting the continental United States, scientists said Tuesday. “We’re seeing this continued increase of warmth pervading across the entire Arctic system,” said Emily Osborne, an official
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This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu, composed of 12 PolyCam images collected on December 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles (24 km). NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona/Handout via REUTERS ORLANDO, Fla. (Reuters) – NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft has discovered ingredients for water on a relatively nearby skyscraper-sized asteroid, a rocky acorn-shaped object
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Nelly Sachs received the Nobel Prize for Literature on her birthday in 1966.Google Monday’s Google Doodle honors poet and playwright Nelly Sachs, who escaped from Nazi Germany in 1940 and gave a voice to the horrors of the Holocaust and the struggle to live in its aftermath. Born in 1891, Nelly Sachs enjoyed a sheltered,
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NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft has crossed into interstellar space, agency officials announced today. The milestone makes Voyager 2 humanity’s second operating spacecraft in history to go interstellar after the Voyager 1 spacecraft did in August 2012. “One kind of feels like a lucky fluke,” says Justin Kasper, a scientist involved in the Voyager missions from
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Image CreditGaia Stella You’d think that scientists at an international conference on obesity would know by now which diet is best, and why. As it turns out, even the experts still have widely divergent opinions. At a recent meeting of the Obesity Society, organizers held a symposium during which two leading scientists presented the somewhat
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When two lion cubs were found dead one day this September in India’s Gir National Park, forest officials shrugged off their demise as “natural.” Three weeks later, however, 23 lions had perished—sparking fears an epidemic could very quickly devastate the last surviving population of the Asiatic lion. Suspecting a viral outbreak, authorities captured the 19
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Some raw cookie dough? Oh no. (Photo: Getty Images)Getty Wait for it. Wait for it. Wait for it to get done baking before you eat cookie dough. That’s what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is reminding everyone during this Holiday Season when many cookies and other treats are a-baking. This warning also applies
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5 December 2018 Sponsored by When innovators, entrepreneurs, scientists and policy makers meet next week to discuss the UN’s goal of making cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable by 2030, the quality of life for billions of people will be at stake. [embedded content] Some 3.5 billion people live in cities–half of humanity–and the number
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Tis the season…not for the various holidays people celebrate. It is the season for snow forecasts. I live in Georgia, and this weekend the “ominous” word snow was in the forecast. In the South (and frankly the Washington DC area where I lived also), winter forecasting is particularly challenging. However, there is something else that
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