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Everyone knows flu strikes most often during wintertime, but new research indicates a number of other infectious diseases are seasonal, too. Chicken pox often peaks in spring. Sexually transmitted diseases tend to strike most often in the summer, at least in the U.S. And bacterial pneumonia is most common in midwinter, according to a study
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Neuroscientists are coming closer to understanding why some bad moods seem to tumble uncontrollably through your head like a collapsing chain of dominoes. One misbegotten thought after another drives you to imagine frightful things to come or to relive your shameful past: “Remember that one thing five years ago? Wow, I really am a loser.”
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A stressed-out and traumatized father can leave scars in his children. New research suggests this happens because sperm “learn” paternal experiences via a mysterious mode of intercellular communication in which small blebs break off one cell and fuse with another. Carrying proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, these particles ejected from a cell act like a
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Back in August, Indonesia’s peak Islamic body officially declared the measles and rubella vaccine forbidden, under assertions they were based on material derived from pigs. In spite of exceptions permitting the use of the vaccine in the absence of suitable alternatives, millions of Indonesians have followed the spirit of the ruling, causing immunisation rates to plummet.
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WASHINGTON — Despite the uncertainty and partisan gridlock that Tuesday’s election results ensure, one policy change seems guaranteed: hundreds of thousands more poor Americans in red states will qualify for free health coverage through Medicaid. Voters in Idaho, Nebraska and Utah, which President Trump won easily in 2016, approved ballot initiatives to expand the government
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Demis Hassabis, chief executive officer and co-founder of DeepMind Technologies Ltd. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg Demis Hassabis, the CEO of Google DeepMind, has revealed how tough life was while running his previous company, Elixir Studios, in a candid podcast with entrepreneur Rohan Silva and BBC journalist Kamal Ahmed. Hassabis, a genius who raced through school and had to defer
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The Chain of Office of the Dutch city of Leiden is a broad and colorful ceremonial necklace that, draped around the shoulders of Mayor Henri Lenferink, lends a magisterial air to official proceedings in this ancient university town. But whatever gravitas it provided Lenferink as he welcomed a group of researchers to his city, he
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When it comes to figuring out the environmental causes of developmental problems in kids, the landscape is tricky. But a new study has found that exposure to certain types of air pollution early in childhood can significantly raise the risk of developing symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The latest research, conducted in Shanghai,
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David Hu was changing his infant son’s diaper when he got the idea for a study that eventually won him the Ig Nobel prize. No, not the Nobel Prize — the Ig Nobel prize, which bills itself as a reward for “achievements that make people laugh, then think.” As male infants will do, his son
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How do military pilots aim guided weapons through clouds? originally appeared on Quora: the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world. Answer by Tim Morgan, commercial pilot, on Quora: How do military pilots aim guided weapons through clouds?  It depends on how the weapon is
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FILE PHOTO: General view of the centre stage of Web Summit, Europe’s biggest tech conference, in Lisbon, Portugal, November 5, 2018. REUTERS/Pedro Nunes/File Photo LISBON (Reuters) – Portugal plans to build an international launch pad for small satellites in the Azores and has agreed with China to set up a joint research center to make
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After decades of neglect, hellish and cloud-enveloped Venus—sometimes called Earth’s evil twin—is a world ready and waiting for renewed exploration. That is the message from a new study released late last month from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with one important caveat: The best way to return to Venus, the study’s contributors argue, may be to
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BEIJING (Reuters) – U.S. billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates unveiled on Tuesday in Beijing a futuristic toilet that doesn’t need water or sewers and uses chemicals to turn human waste into fertilizer. Microsoft founder Bill Gates speaks during an interview at the fringes of the Reinvented Toilet Expo showcasing sewerless sanitation technology in Beijing, China November
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If you love spiders, you will really love jumping spiders. (If you hate spiders, try reading this article on dandelions.) O.K., if you’re still here, jumping spiders are predators that stalk their prey and leap on them, like a cat. They are smart, agile and have terrific eyesight. It has been clear for a long
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It’s not too much to say that the movement of peoples across borders has been a pressing political concern recently, both in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere. That conversation is so prevalent now that it’s easy to think of this conversation as inevitable, immutable. The idea of the “nation” is one that’s bounded –
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As the Trump administration rolls back Obama-era environmental regulations and continues to swipe at the Affordable Care Act, climate change and health care activists are focusing on state ballot initiatives around the country this Election Day. These measures are on the ballot as a result of citizen petitions, and some appear to have better chances
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After the massacre this week in Sutherland Springs, Texas, that state’s attorney general told Fox News gun control laws will not prevent mass shootings. “This guy violated the laws against murder,” Ken Paxton said of shooter Devin Kelley. “Adding some other gun law would not, I don’t think, in any way change this guy’s behavior.”
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